Saturday, August 17, 2019

"Dean Martin At 100--The Story Of His Signature Song."

Hey pallies, likes it gives us such a tremendous thrill to solemnly seek and search the ol' internet for any and all thin's DINO!  Today we share with all youse Dino-phile a centennial homage of our Dino that we recently uncovered that we have not shared previously here at our humble little ilovedinomartin Dino-pad.  Likes from the awesome annals of the online presence of "Community Voices" of the Pittsburgh Post-Gazette comes "music journalist, critic and historian" Mr. Rich Kietzle most most Dino-rememberin' post, "Dean Martin At 100--The Story Of His Signature Song."

In doin' a wee bit of researchin' of our own annals of ilovedinomartin we discovered that Mr. Kienzle's musical delight in our most beloved Dino was featured here before on February 2, 2012 (CLICK HERE) and February 3, 2012 (CLICK HERE).  We invites youse to dos yourself a huge Dino-favor and check 'em out.

Likes Rich's centennial Dino-gram was certainly worth our wait to discover it as it  powerfully perfectly fits as just a couple of days ago on Thursday we once 'gain coolly celebrated that hugely historical moment in August in the year of our Dino 1964 that our King of Cool busted the Beatles off the charts with his signature croon "Everybody Loves Somebody Sometime."  'long with potent patter, Kienzle offers 3---count 'em---3 versions of the song from youtube and one of 'em is one that wes knows we never ever heard before, or even knew that it existed.

It turns out that our Dino sang  "Everybody Loves Somebody " for the Bob Hope radio programme that aired on October 26, 1948.  We are likes greatly grateful to even know that this recordin' exists, let alone be able to hear the youtube version posted by Rich.  And, pallies, in doin' just a bit more Dino-researchin' via google, we and thee can listen to the whole episode that features our Dino and his partner Mr. Jerry Lewis hangin' with Mr. Hope by CLICKING HERE.

And Dino-holics, likes if this weren't 'nough Dino-action for one day, Mr. Kienzle also includes viral versions of our Dino and Mr.Elvis Presley (as we all know Elvis idolized our Dino) singin' "I Don't Care If The Sun Don't Shine."  We gotta 'fess up dudes that we are in Dino-rapture!  We supremely swankly salute Mr. Rich Kiezle and all the pallies at "Community Voices" of the Pittsburgh Post-Gazette for this greatest of great Dino-remembrance puttin' an awesome accent on our Dino's numero uno tune, "Everybody Loves Somebody Sometime."   We wanna to absolutely apologize to Rich for not sharin' his perfect prose prior to today, but likes we are absolutely appreciative that we finally got to share it with Dino-philes everywhere.   To checks this out in it's original source, likes simply clicks on the tag of this Dino-gram.

We Remain,

Yours In Dino,

Dino Martin Peters

Dean Martin At 100--The Story Of His Signature Song

Thursday, 08 June 2017 06:43 AM Written by  
dino
 Yesterday marked Dean Martin's 100th Birthday. Immortal because of his own work with Jerry Lewis, alone and as part of the Rat Pack with Frank Sinatra and Sammy Davis, Jr., his recorded legacy is vast and varied. It also has a couple of curiosities in it. One involves his best known song, "Everybody Loves Somebody."  
The song was credited to Sam Coslow (his name was later removed), Irving Taylor and musician Ken Lane, who later became Martin's fulltime pianist and conductor (seen often on his NBC TV show). But Dean wasn't the first to record it. Frank Sinatra did it for Columbia in 1947.
Dean performed"Everybody" a year later as a guest on Bob Hope's radio show similarly to Sinatra.
1948: "Everybody Loves Somebody "from The Bob Hope Show.
Sinatra recorded it again for Capitol and jazz-blues great Dinah Washington had at it in 1959 with a lavishly arranged version.
Martin apparently forgotten about the song. He was recording an intimate, ballad-oriented album for Reprise Records (owned by Sinatra) with minimal instrumentation in 1964. Dream With Dean: The Intimate Dean Martin featured only a rhythm section behind his vocals, including Lane and three A-list jazz musicians: guitarist Barney Kessel, Red Mitchell on bass with drummer Irv Cottler. The feel was similar to that of Julie London's early vocal  recordings that featured only guitar (Kessel) and bass.
They needed another song to complete the record when Lane threw "Everybody Loves Somebody" into the mix. It became one of the the album's highlights. The producer was former rockabilly and future Nashville producer Jimmy Bowen, then a staff producer at Reprise.
1964: from Dream With Dean.
Bowen and Martin had ideas, even in the year of the British Invasion, the song could be a major hit single with a different arrangement. Bowen had freelance arranger Ernie Freeman, whose roots were in R&B, come up with a more aggressive treatment using strings and choruses. It's likely Freeman used the 1959 Dinah Washington version as a starting point, jumping up the tempo.  This version would appear as a single. Martin was so confident of its success he told son Dean, Jr., a teenage Beatle fan, that his single would "knock your little pallies off the charts." That year, Dean openly mocked the Rolling Stones when they appeared on the weekly ABC variety series The Hollywood Palace the week he guest hosted.
In the end, the single did just that. Released in June of '64, it went to # 1, displacing the Beatles. It gave new life to Martin's recording and performing career, leading to the enormously weekly Dean Martin Show on NBC, with "Everybody" as the theme.
1964: The single. The graphic is the LP that followed  Note the insert "The hit version" to differentiate it from the Dream With Deanrecording.
"Everybody Loves Somebody" is inscribed on the plaque of Dino's burial vault at Westwood Memorial Park in Hollywood.
BONUS:"I Don't Care If The Sun Don't Shine" (1950)
That wasn't the only curiosity involving Dean's music. In 1950, Martin, then one of America's top singers-comedians for his work with Jerry Lewis, recorded a rollicking Dixieland version of this tune by composer Mack David. It was a cover of Patti Page's hit single (her first Top Ten). Dean's later appeared on one of his finest early albums: Swingin' Down Yonder, a collection of country, pop and Dixieland tunes. He also sang it in the 1953 Martin-Lewis film Scared Stiff.
1950 recording:
Four years later, a 19 year old Dean Martin fan in Memphis, Elvis Presley, recorded his own take on the song at Sun Records with Scotty Moore on lead guitar and Bill Black playing bass. He toyed with the original lyrics to give it a more teen-flavored, rockabilly country feel.
1954: Elvis Presley (Sun 210)

Friday, August 16, 2019

Dean Martin pretty much plays Matt Helm as himself, Dino the hard-drinking womanizer.


Derek Redmond
Hey pallies, likes we gotta 'fess up that our cravin's to devour  more 'n more Dino as Helm scribin's is currently in high gear after postin' on Monday and Tuesday of this Dino-week those incredibly inspirin' Dino-reflections from Mr. Nick Guzan who holds fantastically forth at the swankest of swank style site, "BAMF Style -Iconic style from movies and TV."  So, likes, onward we goes usin' the search engine at Goggle to fully feed our Dino as Helm absolute addiction.

We were remarkably rewards for our energetic efforts by stoppin' by a pad tagged CJ3B the is all things Jeep. Blogger Mr. Derek Redmond (pictured on the left), obviously a Jeep-aholic, holds forth there.  Redmond's bio tells us that he "retired in 2015 from a career as a cinematographer and a lecturer in film, video and digital media production at the Department of Film and Media at Queen's University in Kingston, Canada," so he is a pallie who is well qualified to review flicks and we were totally totally thrilled to find his perfect post on Helmer numero tres, "The Ambushers" which we share below.

Derek's respectable review is tagged "The Ambushers (1967) - Matt Helm Rides Again -- In a Jeep."
It's  ubber unique Dino-prose as keen knower of film Redmond focuses in on the use of jeeps in this Dino-caper.  And, most importantly Derek "gets Martin" speakin' the Dino-truth that, " Dean Martin pretty much plays Matt Helm as himself, Dino the hard-drinking womanizer."

We salute Mr. Derek Redmond for usin' his terrific talents in writin' and deep delight in Jeeps to amazin'ly accent our one and only Dino in "The Ambushers."   To checks this out in it's original format, simply clicks on the tag of this Dino-message.

We Remain,

Yours In Dino,

Dino Martin Peters

The Ambushers (1967)

Matt Helm Rides Again -- In a Jeep



PosterThe Ambushers was a 1967 science fiction spy comedy film, very loosely based on the novel by Donald Hamilton. It was the third of four films starring Dean Martin as secret agent Matt Helm. It followed The Silencers and Murderers' Row and like those earlier films was a spoof of the James Bond film series. It was followed by The Wrecking Crew in 1969.
The plot revolved around a government-built flying saucer hijacked in mid-flight by the exiled ruler of an outlaw nation. Secret agent Matt Helm and the ship's former pilot Sheila Sommers are sent to Mexico to recover it.
The film is generally considered the weakest of the Matt Helm series, and is one of The Fifty Worst Films of All Time according to the book by Harry and Michael Medved. But as Andrew Pragasam comments in a review, "With an arsenal of fabulous Sixties fashions, silly sex gags, crazy gadgets and gorgeous women, The Ambushers is far too watchable to qualify as one of the worst movies ever made, even if it isn't an especially good one."
The movie poster illustration was by Robert McGinnis whose many other posters included Breakfast at Tiffanys (his first film poster) and the famous image of James Bond holding a target pistol.
FrameThe theme song heard over the bikini-filled opening credit sequence (hear it on YouTube) was sung by Tommy Boyce & Bobby Hart, who wrote loads of hit songs such as "Come a Little Bit Closer" for Jay & The Americans, and "(I'm Not Your) Steppin' Stone" which was a hit for the Monkees the same year this movie came out. Boyce and Hart in fact wrote, produced and recorded most of the music in the first season of the Monkees' TV show and the first Monkees album, including "Last Train to Clarksville." Great songs recorded by the duo under their own names included "I Wonder What She's Doing Tonight" and "(You're Still My Favorite Girlfriend) Alice Long." (See Boyce & Hart at Wikipedia.)
Three of the actors listed in this frame from the credits played villains in the film, while Beverly Adams played Matt Helm's secretary, Lovey Kravezit.
FrameAnd in fact, the first Jeep driver seen after the opening credits is Lovey Kravezit, arriving at work at Intelligence Counter Espionage (ICE) (80K JPEG) in a brand new Commando.
The C-101 Jeepster Commando was new for the 1967 model year, so it was clearly the vehicle for which Kaiser Jeep wanted Hollywood product placement. Lovey is driving the power-top convertible version.
FrameBut the big attraction for Jeep fans is when Matt and Sheila arrive at Las Brisas resort hotel (110K JPEG) in Acapulco, just at the time the hotel's famous fleet of pink and white DJ-3A Jeeps was being supplemented by some DJ-5's. In this shot you can even see one Jeep with a rear body extension.
FrameDean Martin pretty much plays Matt Helm as himself, Dino the hard-drinking womanizer. He doesn't waste any time in helping himself to a drink from one of the famous room-service waiters carrying a tray in a Jeep.
FrameA running joke in the film is Matt Helm putting Dean Martin's "Everybody Loves Somebody Sometime" on the hi-fi to set the mood when he wants to seduce a girl. In the final scene he tries it again unsuccessfully, but when Frank Sinatra's "Strangers in the Night" comes on, the girl says "Kiss me!" and Matt replies, "You really like Perry Como that much?"
FrameLots of Jeep traffic here, heading up to the 71 cottages of Las Brisas ("the breezes"). On the right is the extended body DJ, with its roof canopy also raised higher, apparently to accomodate passengers on the rear bench seats. Guests at the hotel could either rent their own Jeep or catch regular shuttles up and down the hill. (See also Las Brisas: Birthplace of the Jeep Gala on CJ3B.info.)
FrameMatt and Sheila take a hardtop Commando when they head out into the desert to find the secret compound where the flying saucer is hidden. They discover an unusual International truck (90K JPEG) carrying the mobile weapon used to force the saucer out of the sky.
FramePilot Sheila Sommers is played by Janice Rule, who is perhaps too good an actress to be in this film. But with Dino coasting through his laughable role as Matt Helm, maybe it's best for him to have a foil who seems like she could actually fly a saucer. Janice Rule did a huge amount of television work from the 1950s through the1990's, but is also remembered for some serious films such as The Swimmer (1968) and 3 Women (1977, in which she drove a CJ-3B.)
FrameMatt and Sheila have to deal with the beautiful Francesca Madeiros (an operative for Helm's main nemesis Big O), who poses as a model and seduces him. But Matt tricks her into taking her car into the desert. Just before they rescue her, he tells Sheila, "She asked how the roads were around here, and if she needed a Jeep or something...."
FrameProbably the number one reason people remember The Ambushers is Senta Berger (80K JPEG), the stunning Austrian actress who plays Francesca. The role is almost a spoof of her great performance as a spy in The Quiller Memorandum the previous year. Unfortunately Hollywood generally treated Berger as a starlet rather than a serious actress, but she did have a long career and is greatly admired in Germany, where she became president of the German Film Academy in 2003.
So to paraphrase the review quoted at the top of the page, "With an arsenal of fabulous Sixties fashions, silly sex gags, crazy gadgets, gorgeous women and fun Jeeps, The Ambushers is far too watchable to qualify as one of the worst movies ever made."

Thanks to Vilero in Spain for spotting the Jeeps in this movie. -- Derek Redmond

Thursday, August 15, 2019

On This Day In Dino-history: August 15, 1964

Hey pallies, likes time 'gain for ilovedinomartin to share one of the greatly greatest of the great days in all of recorded Dino-history. Likes from the pallies at the greatest of the great recorded music sites, "Billboard" comes the reminder that it was 55 years ago this very Dino-day that our most most beloved Dino boldly 'n beautifully busted the Beatles off of numero uno position on Billboard's Hot 100 Hit List with what became our main man's main croon..."Everybody Loves Somebody Sometime."

What a tremendous thrill it was then, and still is to this very Dino-day to  completely celebrate this hugest of hugest majestic musical victory for our one and only Dino.  It took the magnificent 'n mighty, potently powerful power of our King of Cool to knock the Kingpins of Rock and Roll off of their throne.  Below is some powerful patter from the pallies at "Billboard" 'long with a great youtube vid of a live recordin' of our Dino croonin' his number uno hit.

We sez our thoughtful thanks to all the folks at "Billboard" who have honored our main man in this wondrous way...showin' that the transformin' power of our Dino simply grows greater and greater with each and every passin' year.  To checks this out in it's original format, simply, as usual, clicks on the tag of this here Dino-report.

We Remain,

Yours In Dino,

Dino Martin Peters



Aug. 15, 1964
Iconic crooner Dean Martin notched his sole No. 1 Billboard Hot 100 hit with "Everybody Loves Somebody." The song proved that middle-of-the-road music could still reign after Beatlemania had begun changing the course of pop earlier that year. "Everybody," in fact, dethroned the Fab Four's fifth No. 1, "A Hard Day's Night."

Wednesday, August 14, 2019

Dean Martin returns with undisguised pleasure, reincarnating Matt Helm always with the relaxed and relaxed style all his own.

Mathieu Lemée 🇫🇷🌍
Hey pallies, likes the last couple of delightful Dino-days postin's here at our humble little ilovedinomartin waterin' hole from the powerfully potent pen of Mr. Nick Guzan  beautifully  bodacious blogger who hangs his hat at the  superb style pad tagged "BAMF Style - Iconic style from movies and TV" has powerfully put us in a mighty marvelous Matt Helm state of Dino-mind and we are completely cravin' us more Helmer prose of the Dino-kind.

Likes when we went searchin' the ol' world wide web for more 'bout our Dino as swingin' spyster Matt Helm we happened 'pon the fantastic flick place "THE GAZETTE OF THE CLUB OF THE MONSTERS" where Canadian blogger Mr.
Mathieu Lemée (pictured on the left) from Montreal has stunnin'ly shared a quintessential quartet of perfect posts of prose 'n pixs of revelatory reflections of the coolest capers ever filmed for the big screen and it is completely clear that Mr. Lemée delightfully digs Dino as Helm.

Permits us to share these deep Dino-thoughts from Mathieu's pen...

"As for Dean Martin, his ease of play does not cost him any effort."

"Dean Martin returns with undisguised pleasure, reincarnating Matt Helm always with the relaxed and relaxed style all his own."

"Dean Martin always plays so relaxed, besides having a good time as Matt Helm."

"....while Dean Martin retains the same casual nonchalance in the skin of the hero, despite some apparent fatigue ."

We shouts out our affirmin' appreciato for the wonderful wise words  that Mr. Mathieu Lemée has incredibly imparted of deepest Dino-devotion and to the pallies at "THE GAZETTE OF THE CLUB OF THE MONSTERS" has placed in print.  To checks this out in it's original format, simply clicks on the tag of this Dino-report.

We Remain,

Yours In Dino,

Dino Martin Peters


THE GAZETTE OF THE CLUB OF THE MONSTERS


NUMBER 51

MATT HELM

By Mathieu Lemée

    




The SILENCERS aka Matt Helm, Very Special Agent - Phil Karlson with Dean Martin, Stella Stevens, Daliah Lavi, Victor Buono, Arthur O'Connell, Robert Webber, James Gregory, Nancy Kovack, Roger C. Carmel, Beverly Adams, Cyd Charisse, 1966, United States, 102m

A terrorist organization called "BIG O" wants to provoke a nuclear disaster on the ground of the United States by diverting an atomic missile to blow it up on a secret American base. Their leader, Tung-Tze, however, fears the intervention of a retired secret agent, Matt Helm, to thwart his business and he orders his henchmen to liquidate him. After escaping an attack, Matt Helm willingly or unwilling to resume service to unravel the case. He manages to come into possession of a magnetic tape that a cabaret singer, Sarita, was supposed to pass to the enemy. A pretty lady, Gail, is involved despite herself in the adventure since she is the only one to have heard the last words of Sarita before she dies murdered. As Matt Helm suspects Gail of being in the pay of his opponents, she has no choice but to accompany him to prove his innocence. Captured by the men of Tung-Tze, Matt Helm and Gail will nevertheless succeed together to defeat his plans by destroying the secret lair of "BIG O".

Whether in Italy, France, Germany or other countries of the world, spy films illustrating the exploits of a super secret agent proliferated during the 1960s, all built on the successful model of James Bond. Just like 007, Matt Helm was born thanks to the pen of a writer, in this case Donald Hamilton. The writers, however, abandoned the harshness of the main character, yet clearly established in the original work, relying rather on the well-known relaxation of his interpreter on the big screen: the actor and singer Dean Martin. The story that follows from it takes on the appearance of pastiche, and the colorful realization underlines even more the intentions of the authors to want to parody the genre. In this regard, the film is quite successful, despite a humor that lacks refinement, and an emphasis on some minor details that slow down the action somewhat. These few shortcomings however do not prevent "THE SILENCERS" to be a light entertainment that is consumed as a good digestive after a delicious meal. We also note the beauty of the actresses (Stella Stevens and Daliah Lavi among others), the gadgets both fun and absurd, and the imposing presence of Victor Buono who cabotine wonderfully in the role of Tung-Tze, thus embodying a least Asian Asian villain with his blue eyes and fatness. As for Dean Martin, his ease of play does not cost him any effort.


MURDERER'S ROW aka Well Played Matt Helm - Henry Levin with Dean Martin, Ann-Margret, Karl Malden, Camilla Sparv, Gregory James, Beverly Adams, Richard Eastman, Tom Reese, Howard Duke, Marcel Hillaire, 1966, United States, 105m

The terrorist organization named "BIG O" has managed to kidnap Dr. Norman Solaris, a scientist who has developed a weapon that can emit powerful sunlight. While waiting for Solaris to build a solar weapon that can annihilate large cities and allow "BIG O" domination of the world, the organization has several US agents "ICE" assassinated by the indications of a man infiltrated among services secrets. The most famous agent of the "ICE", Matt Helm, takes the opportunity to pose as dead in order to have free rein in his investigation to find Solaris, and also to unmask the mole who works for the enemy. Calling himself a famous gangster, Helm travels to the French Riviera and makes contact with the daughter of Solaris, Suzie. Helm's actions, however, attract the attention of an industrialist, Julian Wall, who is precisely the one who holds Dr. Solaris prisoner on behalf of the "BIG O". After several adventures, Matt Helm, with the help of Suzie, manages to deliver Solaris, to unmask the mole, and to counter Julian Wall's plan to annihilate New York. who is the one who holds Dr. Solaris prisoner on behalf of the "BIG O". After several adventures, Matt Helm, with the help of Suzie, manages to deliver Solaris, to unmask the mole, and to counter Julian Wall's plan to annihilate New York. who is the one who holds Dr. Solaris prisoner on behalf of the "BIG O". After several adventures, Matt Helm, with the help of Suzie, manages to deliver Solaris, to unmask the mole, and to counter Julian Wall's plan to annihilate New York.

Just like his British counterpart James Bond, the super secret agent Matt Helm is back in a new film following the success of his first adventure in theaters. Obviously, the producers had already anticipated the success of "THE SILENCERS", since they had already announced in advance at the end of this film their intention to return to the charge the following year. Dean Martin returns with undisguised pleasure, reincarnating Matt Helm always with the relaxed and relaxed style all his own. The budget of "MURDERER'S ROW" is obviously more imposing than the first episode, but the parody approach remains the same since we find with pleasure the use of strange gadgets, music and colorful decorations, and the pleasant and charming side of the hero. However, this monetary contribution allows writers to go a little further in the search for wacky comic effects, and some are sometimes original. The realization also benefits from the situation by giving the whole an airy atmosphere, conducive to the effective exploitation of some tasty visual gags. A few moments of action intervene at the right moment to prevent the plot from running out of steam, and in this respect, a sequence of hovercraft pursuits is to be noted. This does not exceed the level of a commercial product technically well-honed, but we come out entertained anyway. The mannered and tiresome interpretation of Ann-Margaret is the only really negative point of the film.


The AMBUSHERS aka Matt Helm hunted - Henry Levin with Dean Martin, Senta Berger, Janice Rule, Gregory James, Albert Salmi, Kurt Kasznar, David Beverly Adams, Roy Jenson, John Brascia, Linda Foster, 1967, United States, 102m

A flying saucer, developed by American scientists, disappears shortly after it goes into orbit. His pilot, a woman named Sheila Sommers, is found alive a little later in a Mexican forest. The US secret service, better known as ICE, is charging its best agent, Matt Helm, to recover the invention. He travels to Mexico with Sheila, and discovers that other agents are looking for the flying saucer, including a beautiful spy in the service of the terrorist organization called BIG O. Helm also learns that the flying saucer is hidden in the secret lair of an exiled dictator, Jose Ortega, who decided to sell it to the highest bidder.

Why change ingredients when the recipe works? In this third adventure of the American secret agent Matt Helm, the spectator having seen the two previous ones can identify them all: tale of espionage with pastiche flavor, gadgets galore, pretty ladies whose names are word games with character sexual, all presented in unpretentious packaging, if not for the sake of light entertainment. No doubt to make a mockery of the macho character of the genre and try to bring a little novelty, the authors have imagined that the flying saucer, which serves as an issue in the plot, can be driven only by women ; men all succumb to lethal radiations as soon as they enter the ship. Everything is generously seasoned with funny improbabilities, and fantasy sometimes easy, where the freedom of manners of the hero is sometimes emphasized to excess. The staging particularly emphasizes scenes and a brightly colored photograph, even more than in the first two episodes, no doubt to bring out more the few elements of fantastic character scattered in the scenario. A soundtrack of quality, sound typical of the 60s and signed Hugo Montenegro, is again to highlight. "THE AMBUSHERS" can be watched, even if the film contains here and there some falls of rhythm. Dean Martin always plays so relaxed, besides having a good time as Matt Helm.


The WRECKING CREW aka Matt Helm settles his accounts - Phil Karlson with Dean Martin, Elke Sommer, Sharon Tate, Nancy Kwan, Nigel Green, Tina Louise, John Larch, 1969, United States, 105m

Count Contini and his henchmen managed to seize a load of $ 1 billion worth of gold bullion. The count's intention is to bring down the economy of the countries to which the stolen gold belongs. The US secret service then task Matt Helm to recover the bullion, and he is assisted in his mission by a beautiful British colleague, Freya Carlson. Helm and Freya go to Denmark, where Contini has its headquarters. He tries to eliminate the American agent several times, often through his lovely female acolytes. Helm escapes all traps and manages, along with Freya, to prevent Count Contini from

Although near the end of the film, a text on the screen announces a fifth adventure of the secret agent Matt Helm on the screens, "THE WRECKING CREW" was indeed the last, following the shock that the assassination Actress Sharon Tate by Charlie Manson and his "family" sparked at Dean Martin and the rest of the team. It must be said that with a few exceptions, this fourth avatar does not bring anything new, and the lack of variations in the use of ingredients has meant that the sauce was not as popular to the taste of the public. Thus, despite an obvious lightness atmosphere, which makes the whole entertaining, it is strongly felt that the intrigue feels the déjà-vu and that the usual paraphernalia gadgets, fights and pretty girls feel the warmed up. Luckily, the comedian's easy-going game saves the day, especially that of Nigel Green in the role of the service villain, while Dean Martin retains the same casual nonchalance in the skin of the hero, despite some apparent fatigue . The very good music of Hugo Montenegro is not to be disdained either in the positive aspects of the film. As for the realization, it is visibly broken the rules of the genre by sticking to proven processes, and by respecting the technical uses of the well packaged consumer product. "THE WRECKING CREW" Mathieu Lemée








LA GAZETTE DU CLUB DES MONSTRES


NUMÉRO 51

MATT HELM

Par Mathieu Lemée

The SILENCERS aka Matt Helm, Agent Très Spécial - Phil Karlson avec Dean Martin, Stella Stevens, Daliah Lavi, Victor Buono, Arthur O'Connell, Robert Webber, James Gregory, Nancy Kovack, Roger C. Carmel, Beverly Adams, Cyd Charisse, 1966, États-Unis, 102m

Une organisation terroriste nommée "BIG O" veut provoquer une catastrophe nucléaire sur le sol des États-Unis en détournant un missile atomique pour le faire exploser sur une base secrète américaine. Leur chef, Tung-Tze, craint toutefois l'intervention d'un agent secret à la retraite, Matt Helm, pour contrecarrer son entreprise et il ordonne à ses hommes de main de le liquider. Après avoir échappé à un attentat, Matt Helm accepte bon gré mal gré de reprendre du service pour débrouiller l'affaire. Il parvient à entrer en possession d'un ruban magnétique qu'une chanteuse de cabaret, Sarita, était censé faire passer à l'ennemi. Une jolie demoiselle, Gail, est impliquée malgré elle dans l'aventure puisqu'elle est la seule à avoir entendu les dernières paroles de Sarita avant qu'elle ne meurt assassinée. Comme Matt Helm soupçonne Gail d'être à la solde de ses adversaires, elle n'a d'autre choix que de l'accompagner pour prouver son innocence. Capturés par les hommes de Tung-Tze, Matt Helm et Gail parviendront néanmoins ensemble à faire échouer ses plans en détruisant le repaire secret du "BIG O".

Que ce soit en Italie, en France, en Allemagne ou dans d'autres pays du monde, les films d'espionnage illustrant les exploits d'un super agent secret se sont multipliés durant les années 60, tous bâtis sur le modèle à succès de James Bond. Tout comme 007, Matt Helm a vu le jour grâce à la plume d'un écrivain, en l'occurrence Donald Hamilton. Les scénaristes ont toutefois délaissé la dureté du personnage principal, pourtant clairement établie dans l'oeuvre originale, en misant plutôt sur la décontraction bien connue de son interprète au grand écran: l'acteur et chanteur Dean Martin. Le récit qui en découle prend donc des allures de pastiche, et la réalisation colorée souligne davantage encore les intentions des auteurs à vouloir parodier le genre. Sur ce plan, le film se veut assez réussi, malgré un humour qui manque de raffinement, et une insistance portée sur certains détails secondaires qui ralentissent quelque peu l'action. Ces quelques petites lacunes n'empêchent cependant pas "THE SILENCERS" d'être un divertissement léger qui se consomme comme un bon digestif après un délicieux repas. On retiendra d'ailleurs la beauté des actrices (Stella Stevens et Daliah Lavi entre autres), les gadgets à la fois amusants et absurdes, et la présence imposante de Victor Buono qui cabotine à merveille dans le rôle de Tung-Tze, incarnant ainsi un méchant asiatique le moins asiatique qui soit avec ses yeux bleus et son embonpoint. Quant à Dean Martin, son jeu tout en aisance ne lui coûte à l'évidence aucun effort.



MURDERER'S ROW aka Bien Joué Matt Helm - Henry Levin avec Dean Martin, Ann-Margret, Karl Malden, Camilla Sparv, James Gregory, Beverly Adams, Richard Eastman, Tom Reese, Duke Howard, Marcel Hillaire, 1966, États Unis, 105m

L'organisation terroriste nommée "BIG O" a réussi à enlever le docteur Norman Solaris, un savant qui a mis au point une arme pouvant émettre de puissants rayons solaires. En attendant que Solaris puisse construire une arme solaire pouvant anéantir de grandes villes et permettre ainsi au "BIG O" la domination du monde, l'organisation fait assassiner plusieurs agents américains du "ICE" grâce aux indications d'un homme infiltré parmi les services secrets. Le plus célèbre agent du "ICE", Matt Helm, profite de l'occasion pour se faire passer pour mort afin d'avoir les coudées franches dans son enquête pour retrouver Solaris, et aussi démasquer la taupe qui travaille pour l'ennemi. Se faisant passer pour un gangster célèbre, Helm se rend sur la Côte d'Azur et entre en contact avec la fille de Solaris, Suzie. Les agissements de Helm attirent cependant l'attention d'un industriel, Julian Wall, qui est justement celui qui détient le docteur Solaris prisonnier pour le compte du "BIG O". Après plusieurs péripéties, Matt Helm, avec l'aide de Suzie, parvient à délivrer Solaris, à démasquer la taupe, et à contrer le projet de Julian Wall d'anéantir New-York.

Au même titre que son homologue britannique James Bond, le super agent secret Matt Helm est de retour dans un nouveau film suite au succès de sa première aventure dans les salles obscures. Visiblement, les producteurs avaient déjà anticipé la réussite de "THE SILENCERS", puisqu'ils avaient déjà annoncé à l'avance à la fin de ce film leur intention de revenir à la charge dès l'année suivante. Dean Martin revient donc avec un plaisir non dissimulée, réincarner Matt Helm toujours avec le style décontractée et détendue qui lui est propre. Le budget de "MURDERER'S ROW" apparaît à l'évidence plus imposant que le premier épisode, mais l'approche parodique demeure la même puisqu'on y retrouve avec plaisir l'usage de gadgets étranges, la musique et les décors colorés, et le côté plaisantin et charmeur du héros. Toutefois, cet apport monétaire permet aux scénaristes d'aller un peu plus loin dans la recherche d'effets comiques farfelus, et certains se révèlent parfois originaux. La réalisation tire également profit de la situation en conférant à l'ensemble une ambiance aérée, propice à l'exploitation efficace de certains gags visuels savoureux. Quelques moments d'action interviennent au bon moment pour empêcher l'intrigue de s'essouffler, et à cet égard, une séquence de poursuite en aéroglisseurs est à signaler. Cela ne dépasse pas le niveau d'un produit commercial techniquement bien rodé, mais on en ressort diverti quand même. L'interprétation maniérée et fatiguante d'Ann-Margaret se veut le seul point vraiment négatif du film.



The AMBUSHERS aka Matt Helm traqué - Henry Levin avec Dean Martin, Senta Berger, Janice Rule, James Gregory, Albert Salmi, Kurt Kasznar, Beverly Adams, David Mauro, Roy Jenson, John Brascia, Linda Foster, 1967, États Unis, 102m

Une soucoupe volante, mise au point par des scientifiques américains, disparaît peu de temps après sa mise en orbite. Son pilote, une femme nommée Sheila Sommers, est retrouvée en vie un peu plus tard dans une forêt mexicaine. Le service secret américain, mieux connu sous le nom de ICE, charge son meilleur agent, Matt Helm, de retrouver l'invention. Il se rend au Mexique en compagnie de Sheila, et découvre que d'autres agents sont à la recherche de la soucoupe volante, dont une ravissante espionne au service de l'organisation terroriste nommée BIG O. Helm apprend également que la soucoupe volante est cachée dans le repaire secret d'un dictateur exilé, Jose Ortega, qui a décidé de la vendre au plus offrant. Aidé de Sheila et de quelques gadgets, Helm réussit à récupérer la soucoupe et à éliminer ses adversaires.

Pourquoi changer les ingrédients quand la recette fonctionne? Dans cette troisième aventure de l'agent secret américain Matt Helm, le spectateur ayant vu les deux précédentes peut tous les identifier: récit d'espionnage à saveur de pastiche, gadgets à gogo, jolies demoiselles dont les noms sont des jeux de mots à caractère sexuel, le tout présenté dans un emballage sans aucune prétention, si ce n'est dans l'optique d'un divertissement léger. Sans doute pour se moquer un peu du caractère macho du genre et tenter d'y apporter un peu de nouveauté, les auteurs ont imaginé que la soucoupe volante, qui sert d'enjeu dans l'intrigue, ne puisse être pilotée que par des femmes; les hommes succombant tous à des radiations mortels dès qu'ils pénètrent dans le vaisseau. Le tout est généreusement assaisonné d'invraisemblances rigolotes, et d'un humour fantaisiste parfois facile, où la liberté de moeurs du héros est parfois soulignée à outrance. La mise en scène insiste particulièrement sur des décors et une photographie aux couleurs vives, plus encore que dans les deux premiers épisodes, sans doute pour faire ressortir davantage les quelques éléments à caractère fantastique disséminés dans le scénario. Une trame sonore de qualité, au son typique des années 60 et signée Hugo Montenegro, est à nouveau à souligner. "THE AMBUSHERS" se laisse donc regarder, même si le film contient ici et là quelques chutes de rythme. Dean Martin joue toujours de façon aussi détendue, en plus de s'amuser ferme dans la peau de Matt Helm.



The WRECKING CREW aka Matt Helm règle ses comptes - Phil Karlson avec Dean Martin, Elke Sommer, Sharon Tate, Nancy Kwan, Nigel Green, Tina Louise, John Larch, 1969,  États-Unis, 105m

Le comte Contini et ses hommes de main ont réussi à s'emparer d'un chargement de lingots d'or d'une valeur de 1 milliard de dollars. L'intention du comte est de faire chuter l'économie des pays à qui l'or volé appartient. Les services secrets américains chargent donc Matt Helm de récupérer les lingots, et il est assisté dans sa mission par une jolie collègue britannique, Freya Carlson. Helm et Freya se rendent au Danemark, où Contini a son quartier général. Celui-ci tente d'éliminer à plusieurs reprises l'agent américain, souvent par le biais de ses ravissantes acolytes féminines. Helm échappe à tous les pièges et parvient, en compagnie de Freya, à empêcher le comte Contini de s'échapper avec l'or à bord de son train privé.

Bien que vers la fin du film, un texte à l'écran annonce une cinquième aventure à venir de l'agent secret Matt Helm sur les écrans, "THE WRECKING CREW" fût bel et bien la dernière, suite au choc que l'assassinat de l'actrice Sharon Tate par Charlie Manson et sa "famille" a suscité chez Dean Martin et le reste de l'équipe. Il faut dire qu'à quelques exceptions près, ce quatrième avatar n'apporte rien de bien neuf, et le manque de variations dans l'emploi des ingrédients a fait que la sauce ne fût pas aussi prenante au goût du public. Ainsi, malgré une atmosphère de légèreté évidente, qui rend l'ensemble divertissant, on a fortement l'impression que l'intrigue sent le déjà-vu et que l'attirail habituel des gadgets, des bagarres et des jolies filles sent le réchauffé. Par bonheur, le jeu plein d'aisance des comédiens vient sauver la mise, en particulier celui de Nigel Green dans le rôle du méchant de service, tandis que Dean Martin conserve la même désinvolture nonchalante dans la peau du héros, malgré une certaine fatigue apparente. La très bonne musique d'Hugo Montenegro n'est pas à dédaigner non plus dans les aspects positifs du film. Quant à la réalisation, elle est visiblement rompue aux règles du genre en s'en tenant à des procédés éprouvés, et en respectant les usages techniques du produit de consommation bien emballé. "THE WRECKING CREW" laisse également le souvenir d'une très bonne performance au grand écran de l'actrice et ex-épouse du réalisateur Roman Polanski, Sharon Tate, avant son assassinat. Mathieu Lemée




















Tuesday, August 13, 2019

Dino’s characterization parodied the character as more of a playboy lounge lizard.....


Hey pallies, likes we're back once 'gain to greatly gift all youse Dino-adulators with marvelously more remarkably revelatory reflections on our beautifully beloved Dino as style icon extraordinaire from the lovin' labors of purely profound prosaist Mr. Nick Guzan (pictured on the left)  who swankly scribes at this swankest of swank style site, "BAMF Style -Iconic style from movies and TV."

Likes today's deep deep Dino-devotion is tagged "Matt Helm’s Blue Blazer in Murderers’ Row" and is stunnin'ly shared by Guzan in huge homage of our Dino's 102nd anniversary of his decent to our planet.  Likes we keenly knows that all youse Dino-philes will greatly glory in yet 'nother extraordinary expose of our Dino's stellar style as sweetly seen in Helmer numbero duo ( our personal fav of the Dino-quartet) "Murder's Row."

We stand in absolute awe of Nick's awesome ability to supremely share in potent pixs and pure poetic prose  our incredible iconic Dino as swingin' spyster Matt Helm,,the coolest of the cool, the hippest of the hip, the randiest of the randy.  Likes 'gain and 'gain we coulda speak on and on 'bout Guzan's incredible insights into Dino as Helm and his wonderful wardrobe of trendy threads, but all that woulda do is delay all youse pallies from imbibin' intensely of Nick's wonderful work.  Once 'gain we profoundly praise and thoughtfully thank Mr. Nick Guzan for his wise words in reverently regalin' our one and only Dino and doin' is powerful part in bringin' pallie after pallie to deep, our, and true Dino-devotion.  To checks this out in it's original source, likes simply clicks on the tag of this Dino-report.

We Remain,

Yours In Dino,

Dino Martin Peters






Matt Helm’s Blue Blazer in Murderers’ Row


Dean Martin as Matt Helm in Murderers' Row (1966)
Dean Martin as Matt Helm in Murderers’ Row (1966)

Vitals

Dean Martin as Matt Helm, smooth secret agent
French Riviera, Summer 1966
Film: Murderers’ Row
Release Date: December 20, 1966
Director: Henry Levin
Costume Designer: Moss Mabry
Tailor: Sy Devore
WARNING! Spoilers ahead!

Background

Happy birthday to Dean Martin, born Dino Paul Crocetti on June 7, 1917, in Steubenville, Ohio! After a successful singing and acting career that included partnerships with Jerry Lewis and the Rat Pack as well as his own TV show, Dino was tapped for the role of Matt Helm, the American counter-agent at the center of author Donald Hamilton’s espionage novels.
While Hamilton wrote his Matt Helm novels with a serious tone, Dino’s characterization parodied the character as more of a playboy lounge lizard, the American satirical answer to his contemporary womanizer James Bond. Thus, the four Matt Helm movies produced in the late ’60s often starred the popular singer opposite many of the most attractive leading ladies of the decade.
Dean Martin with his co-stars Camilla Sparv and Ann-Margret on the set of Murderers' Row (1966).
Dean Martin with his co-stars Camilla Sparv and Ann-Margret on the set of Murderers’ Row (1966).
Martin’s second Matt Helm feature, Murderers’ Row, sets the agent on a mission to rescue a scientist, Dr. Norman Soleris, from the evil Dr. Julian Wall (Karl Malden, who cheerfully chews the scenery in his purple silk suit and rotating accents), aided by the scientist’s daughter Suzie (Ann-Margret) who “borrows” her preppy boyfriend Billy’s boat to transport them. Murderers’ Row reunited Karl Malden and Ann-Margreat a year after the two co-starred with Steve McQueen in The Cincinnati Kid.
I'm not sure if it qualifies for a full-length BAMF Style post, but can we all appreciate Karl Malden's purple silk suit as Dr. Wall? It's hardly timeless or classic... but Malden pulls it off.
I’m not sure if it qualifies for a full-length BAMF Style post, but can we all appreciate Karl Malden’s purple silk suit as Dr. Wall? It’s hardly timeless or classic… but Malden pulls it off.
Matt and Suzie are captured—of course—and the agent’s true identity is revealed. A plot clearly inspired by Dr. No follows, though Ann-Margret’s Suzie proves to be much more than a stylish damsel-in-distress in an era of more complacent Bond girls. Once she’s released from her torture wall, Suzie sabotages Dr. Wall’s computer system, activates a super-magnet that helps Matt evade his most dangerous attacker, and takes action to take out the pilot of Dr. Wall’s hovercraft to control it herself.

What’d He Wear?

Perhaps a nod to their nautical transportation, Matt Helm dresses in a blue double-breasted blazer that recalls a classic naval reefer jacket. These bolder blue blazers were increasingly fashionable during the mid-to-late 1960s, as recently popularized by Roger Sterling‘s rotation of at least three similar double-breasted blue blazers in the later seasons of Mad Men.
Between Matt's blue double-breasted blazer and Suzie's Breton stripe jumper, the spy couple sets an attractive example for timeless style at sea!
Between Matt’s blue double-breasted blazer and Suzie’s Breton stripe jumper, the spy couple sets an attractive example for timeless style at sea!
The blazer is made from a rich blue material with a soft nap and sheen that could indicate the luxurious combination of a cashmere and silk blend. The double-breasted jacket has peak lapels that roll to a single buttoning point on the four-button front. All four of the buttons are silver-toned metal shank buttons.
Not the ideal situation for a spy in a dastardly villain's headquarters.
Not the ideal situation for a spy in a dastardly villain’s headquarters.
The blazer has a welted breast pocket, flapped hip pockets, and non-functioning two-button cuffs with smaller versions of the silver-toned shank buttons on the front. The blazer also has double vents.
Matt loads his pockets to prepare for a final confrontation with Dr. Wall.
Matt loads his pockets to prepare for a final confrontation with Dr. Wall.
The leisure-embracing Matt Helm often supplements his suits, sport jackets, and blazers with the easy comfort of a pullover turtleneck jumper. In this case, he sports a powder blue turtleneck that complements his blazer. The jumper has a finely ribbed-knit roll neck (or “polo neck”), cuffs, and hem.
Looking smooth, even in distress.
Looking smooth, even in distress.
Matt wears his turtleneck untucked over his waistband, but his action scenes (and even a few inaction scenes) give us looks at the details of his gray sharkskin wool trousers, including the beltless waistband with buckle-tab adjusters on the sides and the single reverse pleats on each side of the fly. The trousers have slanted side pockets, no back pockets, and straight legs that end with plain-hemmed bottoms.
Matt wears black suede chukka boots and black socks.
The suede chukka boots absorb much of the ground sand as Matt fights Dr. Wall's henchmen.
The suede chukka boots absorb much of the ground sand as Matt fights Dr. Wall’s henchmen.
“Polka dot shorts!” exclaims Suzie.
Thanks to Suzie’s loose grip during their maritime rescue, no questions are left unanswered about Matt Helm’s choice of undergarments with this outfit, wearing a pair of white cotton boxer shorts with very large crimson red polka dots.
Few people are this amused by their pants being pulled down unexpectedly, but it makes sense that Dino wouldn't mind Ann-Margret being the one doing the pulling. This is one instance where a belt may be preferable to side adjusters, though.
Few people are this amused by their pants being pulled down unexpectedly, but it makes sense that Dino wouldn’t mind Ann-Margret being the one doing the pulling. This is one instance where a belt may be preferable to side adjusters, though.

What to Imbibe

Matt pretends that he will take Dr. Wall’s side by pouring himself a glass of Bourbon for a monitored call to his boss, Mac, who knows that it’s a ruse by telling his colleagues: “Matt Helm never took a drink of bourbon in his life!”
With Suzie chained for torture on the wall behind him, Matt buys time by indicating to his bosses that he is drinking Bourbon rather than his beloved Scotch.
With Suzie chained for torture on the wall behind him, Matt buys time by indicating to his bosses that he is drinking Bourbon rather than his beloved Scotch.
Indeed, Matt Helm shares Dean Martin’s preferred whisk(e)y of choice: Scotch.

The Gun

The Matt Helm series continued to separate itself from the comparatively grounded early James Bond adventures by issuing its hero with a series of secret weapons developed with bizarre quirks, such as the Hy Hunter Bolomauser modified AR-7 pistol that only fires ten seconds after the trigger is pulled. (Source: IMFDB)
Bond fans would recall the Armalite AR-7 survival rifle in 007’s hands as he shot a Bulgar assassin and disabled a SPECTRE helicopter in From Russia With Love. In this case, the weapon has been cut down to only its main receiver with a shortened, detachable barrel and a large wooden grip, somewhat resembling the classic Mauser C-96 “Broomhandle” pistol or—perhaps more accurately—the Star Wars “blaster” that the C-96 inspired.
Matt unboxes his modified AR-7 while on Billy's yacht.
Matt unboxes his modified AR-7 while on Billy’s yacht.
Despite its quirks, the gun is used quite effectively, confounding Matt’s attackers when they pick it up and often trade friendly fire… and it ultimately proves to be the undoing of Dr. Wall himself.
Dr. Wall (dying): Clever.
Matt Helm: If you say so.
Matt's pistol falls to the ground during a fight at Dr. Wall's base.
Matt’s pistol falls to the ground during a fight at Dr. Wall’s base.
A guard uses Matt’s delayed-fire AR-7 to accidentally take out another guard who, in turn, returns fire with his own folding-stock carbine. With both guards out of commission, Matt upgrades his firepower by arming himself with the latter guard’s M1A1 Carbine, a semi-automatic rifle chambered for .30 Carbine that was developed for the U.S. Army and most widely fielded by paratroopers during World War II. The side-folding stock differentiates the M1A1 from the standard M1 Carbine model.
Matt uses the M1A1 Carbine to dispatch another guard who has Suzie in his gun sights.
Matt uses the M1A1 Carbine to dispatch another guard who has Suzie in his gun sights.
Somewhat less lethal is Matt’s pocket pistol taken from Coco (Camilla Sparv), a nickel-plated and ornately engraved “ice” pistol that fires an icy blast rather than actual bullets. The weapon comes in handy to silently—if somewhat unrealistically—disable several of Dr. Wall’s guards that he encounters during his infiltration of the lair.
Matt cools down one of Dr. Wall's guards.
Matt cools down one of Dr. Wall’s guards.

How to Get the Look

Dean Martin as Matt Helm in Murderers' Row (1966)
Dean Martin as Matt Helm in Murderers’ Row (1966)
Whether your day at sea will end up with invading a villain’s lair or simply enjoying a drink on the deck of your friend’s boat, Dean Martin’s Matt Helm provides a stylish template for your nautical adventure.
  • Blue napped cashmere/silk double-breasted blazer with peak lapels, 4×1-button front, welted breast pocket, straight flapped hip pockets, 2-button cuffs, and double vents
  • Powder blue turtleneck with ribbed-knit neck, cuffs, and hem
  • Gray sharkskin single reverse-pleated trousers with buckle-tab side adjusters, slanted side pockets, and plain-hemmed bottoms
  • Black suede chukka boots
  • Black socks
  • White (with large dark red polka dots) cotton boxer shorts

Do Yourself a Favor and…

Check out the movie or the whole four-film Matt Helm series.

The Quote

Nobody dies for nothing.